Media Limits and Kids: Finding the Right Balance

negative impacts of media on children

A little screen time might seem like no big deal. But the impact of too much media on children can lead to developmental issues. So alternative ways to play are key!

It might be considered less than ideal, but we all put our child in front of the television now and then. Whether it’s Sesame Street or SpongeBob, different types of media provide a break from having to watch over your child.

But too much television and too many video games can have a negative impact on your child’s well being. For this reason, it’s important to know the negative impact of media to keep their development in check.

sports video game

What are some types of media?

With technology available in every nook and cranny, there is a multitude of places your kids can access media. It may be a YouTube station, a kid’s show on your iPhone or an action movie on the television. And, with video games and iPads in the mix, there’s no shortage of ways to access information! Yet, whether it’s the television or the phone screen, too much time with media can have an adverse effect. Given the impacts of media on society and children, it’s important to be aware of how accessible screen time is nowadays.

What are the negative impacts of media on children?

Whether it’s for a breather or as a learning method, there’s no doubt that television and computer games have benefits. There are a lot of educational television shows and games out there that assist with memory and problem-solving.

However, there are negative impacts of media that can hamper a child’s development. According to a study by Bushman and Huesmann (2006), exposure to media violence led to more aggressive behavior in children. As well, a 2007 study determined a relationship between media exposure and gender stereotyping. Beyond these studies, too much media time can lead to a sedentary lifestyle and issues with academics.

Mom and Daughter watching TV

How do you keep your kids away from television?

As most parents know, it can be pretty hard to keep your kid away from the television. But you can help your children find other ways to entertain themselves. A healthy relationship with screens can make for a well-balanced, happier child. Whether your children are outside, interacting with others or playing board games, activities away from media-centric devices are important. There should be limits on screen time – whether 30 minutes or an hour – to give them time to be creative. House rules are also important, so consider keeping devices away from the dinner table and out of the bedrooms.

jenga family game night

What are fun games children can play?

Fortunately, there are plenty of alternatives to television and computers for your children, whether they’re young or teenaged. Younger kids can engage in a variety of things whether it’s playing at the local park or using board games. They’re also good at coming up with their own imagination-inspired games that can amuse for hours! While older kids are more likely to be attached to smartphones or television, there are alternatives for them too. They may want to play sports with a friend or on their own, whether it’s hockey, soccer or tennis. They also have the option of getting outside with their friends, reading books or camping. With the impacts of media on children, it’s important to have an abundance of alternatives to keep them occupied.

It may seem hard to keep your kids away, but the impact of media can be significant with too much television time. If you’ve imposed limits on your kid’s screen time consumption, give us your ideas in our comments section. Be sure to use FamilyApp as a healthy way for your children to engage with technology.

With so many options out in the world, it’s a shame to lose the opportunity while sitting behind a screen!

childchild’s developmentcomputer gamedevelopmentimpact of mediamedia consumptionmedia timemental health

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